NEW MENTAL HEALTH CONSUMER PEAK BODY – Significant roles available

The initiative to establish a new mental health consumer representative peak organisation is set to have a significant impact on the support for those with mental health issues throughout Queensland.

We only have to look at the phenomenal achievements of Health Consumers Queensland (HCQ) in the last few years to see how such an organisation can ensure that those directly affected can have their voices not only heard but responded to in the form of ongoing effective services. Without HCQ facilitating significant action on many issues addressing healthcare rights, quality, standards and systems, much vital progress would never have been made.

So to have a peak body that will be able to impact, through policy advice and systems advocacy, the way mental health services are delivered to consumers across Queensland is something that should shape the change necessary to better support the lives and futures of those affected.

“Years in the planning, designed to improve the quality of life for hundreds of thousands of Queenslanders, the Peak will launch in 2021.

So the Queensland Mental Health Commission and Windsor Group are working together to fill the following key positions:

  • Inaugural Board Chair – 1 position
  • Inaugural Non-Executive Director (Board Member) – 5 positions
  • Inaugural Non-Executive Director (Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander identified position) (Board Member) – 1 position
  • Interim Chief Executive Officer (12-month contract) – 1 position

“People with their own personal lived/living experience of mental ill-health, service use and recovery are strongly encouraged to apply.”

These are remarkable opportunities to play roles that can achieve significant change in a world where mental health requires as much attention as possible.
If you’re not in a position to apply yourself, please spread the word to ensure that individuals with knowledge, experience and dedication can establish this important Peak Body as one that is committed to ensuring what is needed reaches those in need.

For more information click here to go to the Windsor Group webpage on the positions and application process.

And please use the buttons below to share this post (or copy and paste the following shortlink on social media):
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Recognition for the Barrett School … a Success, an Asset, a Lifesaver

The Barrett School at Tennyson in Brisbane is a Support School specifically for young people with severe and complex mental health issues.

It is different from hospital schools – even from the education programs for inpatients and Day Program patients at Jacaranda Place (opened this year in response to recommendations from the Barrett Adolescent Centre closure Commission of Inquiry). The Barrett Adolescent Special School is not a school with direct connections to a treatment program or with healthcare professionals onsite. The staff are educators. And the students are young people accessing healthcare in their own communities with their own clinicians and allied health support.

BUT what has been missing from the lives of the young people who find themselves at the Barrett School are the opportunities to learn and develop and see a future with options. The things that come with an education at a place where students are truly understood and respected and empowered.

Each young person at Barrett along with their family/carers will have tried everything before discovering the School. But when mental health issues are so severe that a young person cannot engage with a modified program at a regular school or with a flexi-school (including Qld Pathways Colleges) or Distance Education, they are left isolated. At one of the most important stages of life … when social and emotional development are significant and new experiences facilitate cognitive growth as well as the acquisition of skills and knowledge.

A network of young people and carers facilitated by Health Consumers Queensland has recently put out two short videos describing what is needed by those young people dealing with severe and complex mental health issues where education is concerned. (Pt 1 is here and Pt 2 here.)

And severeyouthmentalhealth.org has released our own video with explanations on the approach required and the needs and circumstances that are its basisWe’ve outlined the model of a Support School like Barrett as well as describing the Tennyson-based School’s particular approach. And we’ve celebrated the Barrett School’s outcomes and value in our ‘Focus on Education’ month.

But the Barrett Adolescent Special School has remained low profile – a dedicated team working to support each student in the way that meets individual needs, interests and aspirations.

Until now.

Yesterday, ABC Radio’s Rebecca Levingston used her role as host of the “Mornings” program to highlight the importance of the Barrett School by interviewing two parents whose stories are ones with familiar tones to the School’s educators. The two families are at different stages of their journeys but share the same deep relief and gratitude that they found a school that finally helped their young people reconnect with education.
You can listen to the program here (with the extensive coverage of The Barrett School between 1:45:50 and 2:05:22) 
In addition, Rebecca has extended her reporting by dedicating her column at inqld.com.au to the achievements of the Barrett Adolescent Special School – allowing her to expand on the interviews that clearly resonated not just for the journalist herself but for her many listeners.
You can read that column – “The Brisbane school where just getting out of the car can be the biggest step” – here.

This small but life-changing service is one based on expert knowledge and the skills of professionals adept in the education of a group of young people whose numbers are sadly growing.

It is hoped that this unique resource will not remain unique for longer. Such an asset should be available to young people far beyond Brisbane.

So please share this post and/or the links contained in it as widely as you can.
And click here to contact the Minister for Education to urge that she commit to establishing programs using this specialised education model to be rolled out across Queensland.

(AND  there is no reason why a innovative government cannot utilise – or even monetise to the advantage of the Queensland taxpayer – what a team of dedicated Brisbane educators have developed to facilitate the use of such a model beyond the state by other service providers.)

Huge congratulations to the Barrett School – its staff and its students. You are all key players in a great success story.

 

 

“Who We Are” and “What We Need”

We started our month on education for young people with severe mental health issues by introducing one of the new videos created by the Health Consumers Queensland consumer/carer network – ‘Education for Young People with Severe Mental Health Issues’ (5 Oct). That video – which gives insights into the lives of these young people – is also half of a 2-part series aimed at education service providers (government, private organisations, curriculum designers as well as teachers).

But, in the same way that Part 1 (Who We Are) is able to highlight aspects of what the reality of living with severe and complex youth mental health issues can be, Part 2 (What We Need)’s concise clarity gives indications of the personal perspective that, when shared, can help to properly develop wider understanding of what severe youth mental health issues can actually mean. Especially in relation to the gulf that those directly affected can feel between their experience/needs and what is available to help them – a burden which can add to a situation that’s already overwhelming.

So please share this post or links directly to the videos wherever you see opportunities to raise awareness and/or communicate what’s necessary to ensure the most effective services become available.

CONSUMERS AND CARERS ON EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SEVERE MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES
Experiences with Education: Part 1 – Who We Are 

Experiences with Education: Part 2 – What We Need

 


To read our previous October posts focused on education, go to:

Education for Young People with Severe Mental Health Issues (5 Oct)

And the GOOD NEWS is … (9 Oct)

Not Patients But Students (15 Oct)

And the GOOD NEWS is …

The bad news won’t be news to you. Clearly a global pandemic is going to seriously impact mental health. And young people will bear the burden of the lack of social interaction and opportunities to explore their growing independence.
But THE GOOD NEWS is something that many people aren’t aware of. That there’s a really effective education program operating in Queensland to re-engage young people who have severe mental health issues with learning. And with life. Because the right approach to education is the foundation for so many positive developments.

For the last 6 years, the Barrett Adolescent Special School at Tennyson in Brisbane has been supporting young people in the community with severe mental health issues who had lost hope of finding a education option that could meet their needs. Until the relocation of the school that had been onsite with the treatment centre at Wacol. And with teachers with expertise in engaging students with learning that enables and empowers, lives are being changed for the better.

Until the Barrett School was available to students beyond the inpatient cohort at the Wacol centre, there were (and still are) young people all through our communities who had (and have) lost touch with education. Modified attendance at their regular school, a flexi-school, Distance Ed. … can all fail to understand the needs of those with severe and complex mental health issues. But when Guidance Officers could begin referring students to the Barrett School, hope was finally alive in those young people and their families in the Brisbane area. (Here’s the federal MP for Moreton giving an insight into how it can start.) 

It’s not a short journey. From extended isolation to the rewards of a bespoke education. Even when there are knowledgeable experts supporting young people in an appropriate environment. But with individualised programs that are continually modified and evolving, there are so many ways that young people will develop and learn as they take each step. The whole school team at Barrett devises, reviews and adapts the learning plans of each student with ongoing liaison with base school guidance officers, family members/carers, clinical care providers and MOST IMPORTANTLY, the young person themselves. So that experiences that facilitate their learning also align with their interests and their capabilities, providing opportunities for success and progress. Social and personal growth happen in nurturing environments as knowledge and skills are acquired. And new pathways then begin to open up. The Barrett School’s case management allows young people to explore a range of ways to acquire abilities and information, to set goals and achieve outcomes – from TAFE/ vocational training to academic pursuits to work experience and more. All with the stability of a guiding team of understanding teachers and, perhaps for the first time, with classmates who indicate that you are not alone in the challenges that seemed to set you apart from peers in every way.  

Being disconnected from learning in adolescence has wide-ranging consequences. So becoming connected can be a revelation. Every young person deserves to experience a meaningful education. One that begins to show you who you are and what you can do with your life. And that both of those has considerable value.

So we salute the educators who are opening the door to a future to those who felt left in the dark. The education team at the Barrett Adolescent Special school are a precious resource. A gem that, while currently unique, doesn’t need to be rare. If the government acknowledges the asset as it should, we should see more of these programs throughout the state. There are currently no plans in that area so that is clearly something we must advocate for. (And we’re just a few weeks from a state election. So if you email the Premier and the Education Minister now to stress what young Queenslanders need, that could make a real difference.)

You can read more about the Barrett Adolescent Special School on our Qld Govt (Education) page here, on our page about Support Schools here, and at the school’s website here. Congratulations to Education Queensland on a specialised service that is becoming more vital every day!


This is the second of our October series, ‘Focus on EDUCATION’.

If you haven’t checked out the first yet, you can do so here or go direct to the linked video here.

Education for Young People with Severe Mental Health Issues

Today is World Teachers Day.*

Saturday is World Mental Health Day.*

So at severeyouthmentalhealth.org, we’ll be focussing on EDUCATION for young people with severe mental health issues throughout October.

Highlighting what’s available and what’s needed for young people in this area is relevant anytime. But the global pandemic has made this – like many other things – an urgent issue. The theme of 2020 World Teachers Day is, appropriately:

Leading in crisis, reimagining the future
So this October, we’ll be paying tribute to the truly amazing educators who are already showing the way in specialised education for young people for whom mental health issues have rendered every other education option ineffective. We’ll shine a light on the best but also ask “where’s the rest“?

In future posts we’ll look at Support Schools, the AETC education program and ways educators can share insights across their network. We’ll look at Queensland and see if young people across the state are being properly supported to keep learning through severe mental health issues and a global pandemic.

For those who have disengaged from education because you felt misunderstood, … because even modified, distance ed or other services couldn’t keep you learning, … it’s important that you know that the problem is not with you. Teachers have shown us they can be flexible, resourceful and mindful of individual needs in 2020. But to properly support students with severe mental health issues, teachers need to know more about those young people and the programs that will work to keep them on a path where progress is inevitable. In time. SO the service providers – government and private – must ensure that teachers have that specialised knowledge and that there are places with appropriate environments where individual goals are the foundation for expert staff to provide targeted programs.

But the most important place to start is to hear from the young people themselves about what they need. And the struggle they can go through trying to find it.

Health Consumers Queensland has just released some short videos created by those in their severe youth mental health consumer and carer network. Young people and those close to them have shared their experiences in the hope that education providers will listen. And learn. And then enable their dedicated teaching staff to deliver the programs that can mean the difference for young people affected between a life of dependence and isolation and one where independence, purpose and personal satisfaction are a reality.

Click here to watch Young People with Severe Mental Health Issues: Experiences with Healthcare & Education (9 mins)

And please share this post or the video link so that with understanding will come better services and greater support for those whose lives are so severely challenging.


World Teachers Day will be celebrated by the Queensland Education Department on 30 October and State Education Week will be 25 – 31 October.

Queensland Mental Health Week is 10 – 18 October.

 

NEEDED: Youth Peer Worker for Jacaranda Place

If you’re a young person with lived experience of mental illness who has experienced recovery, you can – with specialised training – support others with mental health difficulties by providing hope and modelling positive strategies and outcomes.

The new Extended Treatment Centre for young people at Chermside in Brisbane will have a number of Peer Workers and Children’s Health Queensland (CHQ) have just begun advertising for an:

 Advanced Peer Worker (Youth)
(click above to go to job listing)

As well as sharing your own lived experience and life stories, you will encourage self-awareness and self-determination in those at a different stage of recovery. You’ll be part of the development, planning and delivery of support services to consumers, carers and families and your capacity to model recovery strategies will allow service providers and Non-Government Organisations (NGO’s) to develop a better understanding of the best framework to achieve positive outcomes for young people and their families.


There are healthcare staff and education staff and other people with qualifications and skills who can help young people with mental health issues. But no one has the expertise of a young person who has lived experience.

Being a Peer Worker in this field is an incredibly valuable role. Not only do you know better than most how it feels to be in the position of the young people who’ll need Jacaranda Place … but you know that the most important people in the lives of young people can be OTHER young people. You’re not at a distance considering what their life might be like. You’re them but just further along the recovery path. So a Peer Worker at the new centre will be a key member of the team.

To find out more, go to the job advertisement by clicking here.

There, you can also access the Role Description and a general Information package about working for Children’s Health Queensland (the Hospital and Health Service responsible for the new AETC).

If you’re in recovery and you feel you could help others along the way to a better future, consider applying for this position.

You could make a real difference in the lives of people who need to know it’s possible.

Deadline extended for Youth Mental Health Consumer Rep role

Please note that due to a technical glitch with the Health Consumers Queensland (HCQ) website, the deadline for applications for the available Youth Mental Health Consumer Rep role has been extended to Friday 22nd February. So please continue to encourage anyone you know who might have expressed an interest to put in their application.

Click below to go directly to the HCQ page:

EXPRESSION OF INTEREST YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH CONSUMER REPRESENTATIVE OPPORTUNITY

or access information from our previous post at:

Youth Mental Health Consumer Opportunity … 18–29 year olds PLEASE APPLY


 

CALLING ALL YOUNG PEOPLE WITH OPINIONS AND IDEAS!!

A lot of different people have been involved in the co-design process still underway for the new Adolescent Extended Treatment Facility to be built at Chermside in Brisbane. And recently the most important people so far have begun to have input – Education Queensland and Health Consumers Queensland were able to facilitate a workshop that included a number of YOUNG PEOPLE THEMSELVES, all of whom made incredibly valuable contributions that will shape many aspects of the new centre.

So now, the Department of Education would like to hear from more young people on issues like:

  • what classrooms and outdoor learning areas should look like
  • what activities the young people attending the centre should be able to participate in
  • how the centre can have as comfortable and homey environment as it possible
  • what skills and knowledge teachers at the centre should have

IN FACT, ANY IDEAS AT ALL!

So …

IF YOU’RE A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT / SOMEONE WHO WAS A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT IN THE LAST 6 YEARS OR SO – OR YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO FITS THAT DESCRIPTION, please spread the word and encourage young people to

TAKE THE SURVEY

It’s quick, easy and online.

And if young people have had experience (personally or through someone else) with mental health issues, those insights would be especially interesting to learn.
But any young person who has ideas on what might be important in a health and education centre that’s going to have residents and day students attending where the focus is on healing and hope for the future can make a really useful contribution.

The survey is at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9WXM99Y
so please use the sharing buttons below to share this post and encourage young people to have their say.

The real experts on what works for young people are young people.
So as many insights as possible from those who know will ensure that the new centre has the best chance of being the place that everyone is hoping it will be.

Progress Report – June 2017

A summary on the progress of the implementation of the recommendations to improve mental health services for those affected by severe and complex adolescent mental health issues in Queensland is now on the DEVELOPMENTS page at severeyouthmentalhealth.org. This includes links to more detail via the Queensland Health Communiqués released following each Steering Committee meeting as well as  other recently tabled reports.

A couple of documents that are likely to be of particular interest are those relating to RECOMMENDATION #4 – THE DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW ADOLESCENT EXTENDED TREATMENT FACILITY (AETF). The Thematic Analysis Report summarises the web feedback provided on the draft Model of Service for the AETF so whether or not you were in a position to complete the online survey, the feedback from that makes for interesting reading. In addition, there is an External Review of the Model of Service by Dr Paul Robertson, a Victorian based child and adolescent psychiatrist of 25 years experience, who undertook consultations with a number of groups and individuals as well as being given access to relevant documentation. His insights will undoubtedly also play in a role in the development of not only the new facility but will encourage a strong focus on the full continuum of care for young people with mental health issues in Queensland (the child and youth mental health services continuum ie. CYMHSC, as Dr Robertson refers to it) and the ongoing co-design process i.e. “A structure to support ongoing consumer and carer participation in the broader CYMHSC system is recommended“.

So a complete and integrated CYMHSC system that will allow access across the state for all young people with mental health issues to a full range of treatment and other service options will be a key issue in the future. This will not only ensure stable and informed transitions from one care/education/support service to another but will hopefully mean that some young people who might otherwise have needed extended inpatient care could achieve recovery without that. For, although the clinical experts who gave evidence at the Barrett Inquiry made clear that there will always be a group of young people whose conditions and individual circumstances are so severe and complex that community-based care will not adequately support their progress, the objective is always to facilitate recovery in the least restrictive environment possible. Queensland needs a statewide service like the AETF but it also needs a complete system within which collaboration and communication are the foundation of operations. Mental health issues impact all aspects of people’s lives and when the individual needs and situations of those suffering are acknowledged, understood and met as effectively and immediately as possible, all our communities will benefit. So Dr Robertson’s urging that collaborative planning does not begin and end with a new facility is extremely pertinent.

He also stresses the need for RESEARCH to be a key component of the new AETF i.e.

Reference is made to the AETF undertaking research. It should be obliged to collect sufficient data to allow appropriate review of its functioning. Adequate resources, funding and time should be allocated for this to occur. Research will not occur without appropriate funding and partnerships with universities or other research organisations. Both appropriate data collection and analysis and research would require an active and resourced plan.

Existing and developing technologies should ensure that research extends beyond the new facility and across all the components of the CYMHSC. Collecting data on the services that precede and follow a young AETF patient’s inpatient treatment – will provide insights into this cohort of young people that is currently lacking across the globe. AND compiling extensive evidence on all youth mental health issues must be seen as a priority in a country where available data states that one in four young Australians currently has a mental health condition [ABS National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Summary of Results 2007 (2008), p 9] and we are regularly made aware that the risk in our youth population only continues to grow. So methods of gathering and collating information on the challenges faced by our young people that not only avoid any negative impact on the vulnerable but may, in fact, have potential for therapeutic benefit require prioritised consideration.

The STATEWIDE FORUMS facilitated by the Health and Education Departments along with Health Consumers Queensland have now concluded and summary information from those should soon become available. Consumers and carer representatives attended these with the support of HCQ and, with a number of factors influencing the ability of local consumers and carers to attend, it has also been invaluable to have Leonie Sanderson, the dedicated HCQ Engagement Advisor, continually open to accepting input via a range of communication avenues (surveys, emails, teleconferences and meetings for specific subgroups) to ensure that anyone in Queensland with insights into service provision in this area have had – and will continue to have – their voices heard.

THE ROLE OF HEALTH CONSUMERS QUEENSLAND has been extremely important in the process so far – supporting and facilitating the active involvement of consumers and carers. And HCQ’s enthusiasm for the project was highlighted when they made it the theme of the Plenary Session at their annual forum (video and written info on that session is available here), with Katherine Moodie and Jeannine Kimber – two of the consumer/carer representatives on the Steering Committee – on the panel alongside John Allan, Executive Director, MHAODB, Queensland Health; Gunther De Graeve, the Managing Director of the consulting firm undertaking the design of the new AETF; and Stacie Hansel, Executive Director, Dept Education & Training. The discussion highlighted the great potential of this project to not only produce innovative and more effective outcomes but to influence the way that future service planning should proceed. Participants significantly endorsed the tangible value of consumer/carer input as Gunther De Graeve stated:

There has been an enormous change in our design development, actually, through this process. … This co-design process really allowed us to reach very deep into the operational requirements, into the therapeutic requirements, the day-to-day requirements and then safety overlays etc. of this facility and it gave us a very wide platform. Traditionally, this engagement goes to clinicians and nursing staff and therapeutic staff and very little with the consumers. … It was a genuine process of actually trying to understand what the needs were and, to date, I still say that if we didn’t do that process we would have designed a very different facility and it probably wouldn’t have been – definitely not – as therapeutic as that facility could be for the patients.

So, as progress goes, it would seem that in many ways we are at the beginning of something bigger than a response to the Inquiry recommendations. Although the planning for the new AETF is well underway and the examination of transition procedures, service agreements and other vital elements that underlay the provision of services has been undertaken, the potential of this project to have an effect on other aspects of service delivery (education, vocational training, support for carers and families, justice and legal issues, housing and accommodation etc.), of approaches and attitudes to mental health and to ALL those affected by these issues must make this project only the start. People with lived experience must have a permanent seat at the table – not just on listening tours and wider consultation but at levels of decision-making and influence. And that includes not only consumers of services and their carers and families but those professionals who have dedicated years of clinical, educational and other practice to these consumers and carers. Those who work daily to improve the lives of others by being part of the reality, by knowing the individuals and supporting them in their journey must always be encouraged to give insights on the practicalities, the impediments, the successes.

Only through true collaboration will success be achieved. And if there is any area in which we must achieve, it is in keeping our young people alive and giving them hope for a better life.

A Budget Boost – its implications for the Future … and the Past

A BLOG POST

The announcement of just under $70 million dollars to not only proceed with the establishment of the new extended treatment and rehabilitation facility at Chermside but to provide two new Step Up Step Down facilities and two new Day Programs to support young people with mental illness (online summary at the ABC website here) demonstrates the current government’s ongoing commitment to those who have been sadly overlooked in the past. Bi-partisan support for these positive moves would begin to ensure some long-needed stability and security for the futures of those in this most vulnerable of groups.

An adolescent extended treatment facility (AETF) fills a dangerous gap in service provision and Step Up Step Down and Day programs are vital in the full continuum of treatment and support options that are required to meet the needs of all young people with mental health issues. Extended inpatient treatment has proven essential for those young Queenslanders with severe and complex issues who have failed to make progress accessing community-based care and outpatient/intermediate care service options. The additional new programs will – if they are accessed in a timely way – provide some young people with the help needed to circumvent a stay in a residential facility. AND for those for whom extended inpatient care is essential, they will ensure that transition from one environment to another is gradual and fully supported according to the individual needs of the young person. Those affected by youth mental health issues across Queensland will be hoping that these kinds of service options will become readily available across the state. As community-based care remains the optimal environment – when the circumstances are right – then all communities must have access to every level of treatment and support.

The plans for the new facilities and programs have come from the process that commenced following the government’s commitment to act on all the recommendations from Justice Margaret Wilson’s report following the BAC Commission of Inquiry. Queensland Health then undertook to utilise a “co-design” process i.e. where bureaucrats, clinicians, specialist architects and other professionals work alongside consumers and carers to plan services that will be most effective. (Acknowledging that expertise lies not only in professional knowledge and practice but in lived experience is currently seen as innovative but should inevitably become standard procedure. Omitting those with practical, pertinent and comprehensive knowledge of the lived experience can only add an important dimension to planning for services in any area.)

Those young people (current and former) and family members who have taken part – and continue to be dedicated to – the process of genuine collaboration have demonstrated a level of commitment that is rare. People whose lives are affected by severe and complex mental health issues find themselves most often in situations where days and nights are to be survived moment by moment; plans are seldom made and often abandoned; and significant trauma, suffering, isolation and emergency management of the effects of illness must be regularly dealt with. And during recovery, the right approach for so many will be to look forward, to put strategies in place to navigate through daily challenges and to resist rumination on issues of anxiety and trauma. So participation in design of future services may be something that could be extremely problematic for the stability of some people’s mental health. There is great understanding throughout the mental health community for all who have suffered to make the right choices that will best support healing and not put mental health at risk and equally, there is deep gratitude for those able to put time and effort into a co-design process, sometimes at personal emotional risk.

And then there are those for whom looking forward provides a view with a void that can’t be filled – the families and communities who have lost loved ones will be experiencing mixed emotions at this announcement. The families of Talieha Nebauer, Will Fowell and Caitlin Wilkinson Whiticker will no doubt be relieved that there continue to be moves to ensure others might not have to suffer the personal tragedies that still shape their lives. Justine Wilkinson, herself a key participant in the co-design process, has told the ABC in relation to the budget commitment (particularly in relation to the continuation of planning for the Chermside AETF):

That’s absolutely fabulous, but this change has to continue, this is just the beginning and it has to be just the beginning. … We need to keep feeding these changes and innovations down the system to pick up young people before they get to that point.

However, we must recognise this news can only be bittersweet for those whose young people did not have the benefit of a government with such a strong commitment to confront youth mental health issues and to listen to those affected to order to provide the needed services. So our thoughts must also be with those whose bereavement continues as we hear this news. We must assure them that we will never fail to remember those who will not have the opportunity to access planned new services and we will continue to support those families for whom an inquest may provide some answers but will inevitably be a traumatic process and will never ever restore what they have lost. Talieha, Will and Caitlin and those that will continue to feel their absence from their lives are always in our thoughts.

The complexity of severe adolescent mental health issues is reflected in the reactions of those with lived experience to this positive budgetary news. There is relief, hope and gratitude but there is also caution and uncertainty from those who have experienced innumerable disappointments and who know that politics can play an inappropriate role in what is necessary in service provision across our communities. And there is renewed reflection on the tragic losses that will continue to impact people’s lives, whatever the future holds.

Severity and complexity in relation to mental health issues is not confined to a small group of young people. It is pervasive. It is challenging. And so it has become a situation that a significant proportion of the population have to live with and an issue that every single one of us must acknowledge.

The support that has been provided to the former Barrett families throughout the community has demonstrated that the capacity to care is our greatest strength. It is the strongest choice that any human being can make and it is undoubtedly the most rewarding. So with, gratitude for all everyone has done to lead us to a day when $70 million is committed to the next generation of Queenslanders, it’s hoped that the future contains not just all the services required but the ongoing support of an impressively caring population.