Preliminary Model of Service for New Facility

NEWS

After three workshops where people with lived experience collaborated with clinicians, education staff and government planners, Queensland Health have today released the preliminary Model of Service (MoS) for the new adolescent extended treatment facility in the grounds of Prince Charles Hospital with the following explanation:

The preliminary Model of Service has been released on the COI Implementation team website at http://www.health.qld.gov.au/improvement/youthmentalhealth/model-of-service/ and you are invited to provide comments to inform ongoing development. This opportunity is open until Friday 17 February, 2017.  If you are aware of other people (individuals or organisations) who may be interested in the model of service and contributing comments you are welcome to provide the link to them.

Health Consumers Queensland will continue to work closely with the Department to support the engagement and involvement of consumers and carers in implementation of the Government response to all recommendations. Consumers and carers are encouraged to contact the appointed Engagement Advisor Leonie Sanderson should they wish to contribute to a group response (http://www.hcq.org.au/our-work/barrett-inquiry/).

As well as being available on the government website, the document is also available here.

Note:  A Model of Service doesn’t aim to describe the day-to-day operations of such a facility. It is a high level document which guides the direction taken by a service – defining
WHO the service is for;
WHAT it hopes to ACHIEVE and
WHAT it intends to DO
.
So anyone with an interest in mental healthcare can provide their input at this level to ensure that those who are currently not catered for in government healthcare service provision will finally have an option that will aid their recovery.

Everyone with any interest in Queensland’s health services, mental health issues and adolescent mental healthcare is urged to look through the Model and give feedback.

This can be done in several different ways:

1) By using the survey form that Queensland Health has made available here.

2) By providing a written response via email to the Commission of Inquiry Implementation Team – Preliminary Model of Service at EDyouthmentalhealth@health.qld.gov.au  or

3) By contacting Leonie Sanderson at Health Consumers Queensland to have input into a group response.

The only way to ensure  that the best possible service becomes available to Queenslanders in need of genuinely effective adolescent extended mental healthcare, education and rehabilitation is to have a say about what is needed NOW.

*

 

What does ‘SEVERE & COMPLEX’ ADOLESCENT mental health issues MEAN?

NEWS

Very few people know.

Quite a few people think they know … but they don’t.

So, as is often the case, education is the answer.

If there is genuine understanding of an issue, most people’s needs will be met. So, in endeavouring to ensure that the needs of those affected by severe and complex adolescent mental health issues are met, those advocating for the right services are gathering information from the people who know – the people who’ve experienced those issues.

If this is you or someone you know, we need your input … so that we can make sure YOU and those close to you … AND others like you … get the best help in future.

We need to put together stories, snapshots, insights into what it’s like living with severe and complex mental health issues during adolescence – for the young people, for their carers, for their families and their friends. 

So if you can tell us just a little, we can put together some examples that resonate with truth but without identifying any individual or contravening anyone’s privacy. We can paint a clear picture of what it feels like to:

  • be turned away from an Emergency Department
  • be denied access to services because you’re TOO unwell
  • have to retell your history over and over again to psychiatrists, psychologists, CYMHS staff
  • etc.

AND what it feels like to:

  • get the right support so that you can attend school
  • work with a clinician who respects your input and acknowledges your strengths
  • build a life with functional relationships and moments of peace
  • etc.

Only your own stories can describe what it’s like. And we know that it’s not easy to tell those stories. So Health Consumers Qld have put together some questions to provide a framework for people to provide their insights. So that we can educate people – the people in positions that will determine the services available to support those dealing with severe and complex adolescent mental health issues.

Click on the links below to have your say – the good, the bad, the unimaginable. If the government officials, medical professionals and bureaucrats don’t know what’s happening to you, they can’t improve the system, the type/amount of support or the approach/attitude of clinical staff etc.

The good things must be replicated and shared.
The bad things must be prevented from impacting people’s lives ever again.

So please fill us in about your significant experiences and knowledge of what works/doesn’t work (AND/OR encourage others to do so) via:

Snapshot for consumers/young people

and

Snapshot for family/carers

and you can provide a brief history with this story template.

Then we’ll be able to educate people about what you’re dealing with (while you remain anonymous). And we can push even harder for better services so that, in the future, you’ll have only good stories to tell.

Progress in Youth Mental Health Planning

NEWS

Queensland Health now have a website that deals specifically with their actions in relation to the Barrett Adolescent Centre Closure Commission of Inquiry. This will provide information on plans for the new extended treatment and education facility as well as other related developments and, along with this site and the dedicated page at Health Consumers Queensland, it’ll inform people of ways they can become involved in plans for future services and policies. Regular Communiqués will be posted on this page along with any other news and relevant information. Continue reading

New centre to be built at Prince Charles Hospital + SURVEY announced

NEWS

The Queensland Premier announced today that a new facility for young people with severe and complex mental health issues would be built in the grounds of Prince Charles Hospital at Chermside in Brisbane’s northern suburbs. A site visit was then made where Premier Palaszczuk and Health Minister Cameron Dick were joined by community members directly affected by the closure of the Barrett Adolescent Centre in January 2014. The Minister had met with families linked to the Barrett Centre yesterday to update them on the progress of the government’s response to the recommendations from the Commission of Inquiry (COI) into the closure and reassure them that health service consumers and carers would continue to play a significant role in planning and developments. Continue reading

MENTAL HEALTH WEEK – Time for ACTION

A BLOG POST

It’s Mental Health Week. And in the past, that has meant a lot of awareness-raising, stigma-quashing and acknowledgement of an issue that has for too long been treated like a shameful secret. And that’s all good, useful stuff. But the time has long since passed for more than knowing nods and pleasant words from those with the capacity to DO instead of DISCUSS.

Mental illness needs ACTION. NOW.

Health service providers, governments, mental health commissions/ advocates/ peak bodies and communities must move from rhetoric to establishing equitable service provision immediately. Otherwise how can anyone believe that mental health issues are, in fact, the cruel scourge afflicting millions unfairly as the annual PR tells us? We know they exist. And, thankfully, we now have knowledge of a range of pharmaceutical adjustments, treatment methods and support programs that mean these issues can be addressed. People CAN heal and progress and discover lives without the agony they once believed was infinite. BUT until the money, time and effort allocated to mental health is in line with those physical health issues that have the same level of impact, people affected by mental illness can’t feel as far from personally responsible for their health concerns as those with a blood disease or multiple sclerosis can. Continue reading

The potential for a new approach based on genuine understanding ­– Part 3

NEWS

An inpatient extended treatment and rehabilitation service with onsite schooling for adolescents to young adults (adulthood rarely begins at 18 years when mental health issues have hindered social and emotional maturity) must consider some essential factors in order to stimulate positive change in the lives of those affected by severe and complex youth mental health issues. Continue reading

Disciplinary Action for two public servants involved in Barrett Centre Closure

NEWS

Following the presentation of the report from the Barrett Adolescent Centre Commission of Inquiry, the Public Service Commission (as an independent central agency of government) was asked to consider whether the conduct of any of the referenced Queensland Government employees breached the Public Service Act 2008 and should then be the subject of a disciplinary process.

Today (8 September 2016), families of former Barrett Centre patients were notified that the Public Service Commission had recommended action against a small number of Queensland Government employees. As a result, Queensland Health has begun disciplinary proceedings Continue reading

The potential for a new approach based on genuine understanding ­– Part 2

As the Steering Committee overseeing the implementation of all the recommendations from the Barrett Centre Commission of Inquiry (COI) has begun its work, it seems opportune to outline what’s needed as far as #4 (“consider a new building in south-east Queensland offering a range of mental health services for young people, including bed-based services”) of the 6 recommendations is concerned. Continue reading

AN INQUEST … families still waiting

A BLOG POST

Talieha Nebauer passed away in April 2014
Will Fowell died in June 2014 and
Caitlin Wilkinson Whiticker took her life in August 2014

Two of those young people were in the care of the state when they took the actions that would end their lives. The other was living with family who had no access to any information on that young person’s treatment plan or assigned clinicians; state of mind and attendance at sessions; or the appropriate behaviour and support to be adopted by those close to her.

Prior to the closure of the Barrett Centre, families had the security of knowing that their loved ones were so well supervised that they would be safe from the fatal outcomes that their mental health issues could lead them towards. They knew that they were in an environment where they were surrounded by friends who’d look after them, who’d demonstrated the kind of caring that would at least help to nullify the feelings of isolation that had previously plagued them. And, for many, there was the hope that long-awaited progress brings – that one day, they would be leading independent lives in the community with all that things that that entails – study, work, social activities, sport, relationships, a family of their own …

but that ended as the turbulent years of uncertainty and decline led to the disintegration of that understanding community. Young people found themselves in unfamiliar places, sometimes surrounded by adult patients and expected to bear the burden of levels of self-sufficiency that they had no experience with; or living in the community and wielding the rights and authority of adulthood without the maturity or capacity to have such a huge responsibility.

April, June, August 2014.

And still no answers for their families. 

Continue reading